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Highlight Lecture

WEB Processing of cathode and electrolyte membranes for all solid state sodium batteries

Tuesday (22.09.2020)
16:25 - 16:40 F: Functional Materials, Surfaces, and Devices 1
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Energy consumption is increasing as the world population increases triggering CO2 gas emissions. One of the solutions to mitigate this CO2 emission is the use of renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels. Moreover, new technologies are evolving to electric and portable ; therefore, there is a need to expand the implementation of energy storage systems in our daily lives. Among them, electrochemical energy storage systems, and more specifically batteries, are attracting growing attention.

A solid-state battery is an evolution of currently available Li-ion batteries (1). In these batteries the liquid electrolyte is replaced by a solid electrolyte made of non-volatile and non-flammable components which improves the safety characteristics of the cells. Moreover, the presence of a solid electrolyte enables the use of metallic anodes which enhances energy density.

Due to existing concerns as to the availability of Li to cope with the expected increasing demand, other chemistries, such as those based in Mg, Zn, Al or Na are being lately explored (2). In this work Na was chosen as an alternative to Li-based batteries. Na resources are approximately 100 times more abundant than those of Li, and are expected to be cheaper. Although its kinetics are slower due to the higher ionic radius and cell energy density is lower, this technology shows the potential to be a good alternative for applications in which space limitations are not a handicap , for example, in stationary storage systems.

This work is focused in the development of an all solid-state sodium battery. More specifically, a layered oxide is selected as the cathode active material, a PEO based polymer as the solid electrolyte and metallic Na as the anode. The processes to prepare thin and dense electrolyte membranes as well as homogeneous cathode laminates are described. In addition, rheological measurements were performed to analyze the properties of the electrolyte and cathode slurries and SEM was used for electrode microstructural analysis. Finally, the cycling performance of the resulting solid state cells is evaluated.

 

1. Varzi A, Raccichini R, Passerini S, Scrosati B. Challenges and prospects of the role of solid electrolytes in the revitalization of lithium metal batteries. Journal of Materials Chemistry A. 2016;4(44):17251–9.

2. Biemolt J, Jungbacker P, van Teijlingen T, Yan N, Rothenberg G. Beyond lithium-based batteries. Vol. 13, Materials. MDPI AG; 2020. p. 425.

Speaker:
Ph.D. Amaia Quintela
CIC Energigune
Additional Authors:
  • Dr. Laida Otaegui
    Centre for Cooperative Research on Alternative Energies (CIC energiGUNE), Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Alava Technology Park, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
  • Dr. Mari Carmen Morant-Miñana
    Centre for Cooperative Research on Alternative Energies (CIC energiGUNE), Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Alava Technology Park, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
  • Dr. Ian Paul Gilbert
    Ormazabal Corporate Technology
  • Aitor Villaverde
    Centre for Cooperative Research on Alternative Energies (CIC energiGUNE), Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Alava Technology Park, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain